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Direction 7

COLLABORATIVE AND INNOVATIVE FACULTY AND STAFF

strategies for 2015-16

• Develop a renewed professional development strategy to support strategic directions

including the exploration of new opportunities for enhanced professional and personal growth

• Implement strategies to support enhanced collaboration and teamwork within schools and

across the College

activities for 2015-16

• Based focus areas for PD sessions in September and November on feedback from the faculty survey

– mental health and wellness, brain strategies for the classroom, tech talks

• Launched a phased plan for the implementation of the new learning management system,

which includes extensive opportunities for collaboration and innovation: pilot faculty com-

mittee; sandbox learning spaces for all faculty; school meetings; department meetings, cross

school forums; tech talks; individual training sessions

• Activated new HR portal to replace the PD request and tracking system in FirstClass

• The Centre for Leadership in Learning offered monthly professional book club meetings to

discuss articles that are aligned with principles of

Towards 20/20

and teaching practices

• Montessori and Senior School faculty established a peer observation program

• Developed Wellness Week programs in support of parents, students, faculty and staff

• Faculty actively participated in CISOntario and CAIS PD experiences – Cohort 21, Project 2051

• Hosted the fall CAIS Leadership Institute at HSC. The event featured more than 25 CAIS

school participants, with six HSC faculty also in attendance

PROJECT BASED LEARNING & PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

PROJECT BASED LEARNING

SIMILARITIES

DIFFERENCES

Focus on an open-ended question or task

Provide authentic applications of content and skills

Build 21st century success skills

Emphasize student independence and inquiry

Are longer and more multifaceted

than traditional lessons or assignments

Often multi-subject

May be lengthy

(weeks or months)

More often single-subject,

but can be multi-subject

Tend to be shorter,

but can be lengthy

Classically follows specific,

traditionally prescribed steps

The “product” may be tangible or

a proposed solution, expressed in

writing or in a presentation

Often uses case studies or fictious

scenarios as

Follows general,

variously-named steps

Includes the creation

of a product or performance

May use scenarios but often

involves real-world,

Poster generated to promote project based learning at HSC.

The 2015CAIS Leadership Institute, attended by over 25CAIS school participants

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Click for File TheCentre for Leadership in Learning (CLL) offersmonthly professional book clubmeetings to discuss articles that are aligned with principles of Towards 20/20 and teaching practices PROJECT BASED LEARNING & PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

PROJECT BASED LEARNING

SIMILARITIES

DIFFERENCES

Focus on an open-ended question or task

Provide authentic applications of content and skills

Build 21st century success skills

Emphasize student independence and inquiry

Are longer and more multifaceted

than traditional lessons or assignments

Often ulti-subject

May be lengthy

(weeks or months)

More often single-subject,

but can be multi-subject

Tend to be shorter,

but can be lengthy

Classically follows specific,

traditionally prescribed steps

The “product” may be tangible or

a proposed solution, expressed in

writing or in a presentation

Often uses case studies or fictious

scenarios as

“ill-structured problems”

Follows general,

variously-named steps

Includes the creation

of a product or performance

May use scenarios but often

involves real-world,

fully authentic tasks and settings

Source: JohnLarmer,Buck Institute forEducation

13

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